Writing Prompt: Walk a mile in my shoes…

The purpose of the “Just Write Right” writing prompts are to give you imaginative subjects to write on and get feedback on your spelling, grammar and punctuation.

Use the comment form to submit your response.

As time permits, I will edit the first 250 words of your response.

Writing prompt: You are searching through your closet and you come across a pair of shoes that you don’t remember buying. You’re pretty sure they’re not any shoes you’ve ever purchased, but you really like the way they look. You decide to try them on. Instantly, you are transported to a room in another time in history. You look in the mirror and see another face staring back at you that’s not your own, but you know it’s you looking at this image. Explain who you are and where you are.

© Just Write Right. All rights reserved. Do not use this prompt without express, written permission.

Writing Prompt: How were your travels?

The purpose of the “Just Write Right” writing prompts are to give you imaginative subjects to write on and get feedback on your spelling, grammar and punctuation.

Use the comment form to submit your response.

As time permits, I will edit the first 250 words of your response.

Writing prompt: One day, at your local public library, you are looking around the very back shelves. There is a particularly boring looking book there, but for some reason it catches your interest and you find yourself removing it from the shelf. However, as soon as you move the book, the bookcase opens in like a door, revealing a deep dark tunnel. Write this scene. Describe your journey down the tunnel and what you see on the way and also what you find once you get to the end of the tunnel.

© Just Write Right. All rights reserved. Do not use this prompt without express, written permission.

Writing Prompt: That’s no baby!

The purpose of the “Just Write Right” writing prompts are to give you imaginative subjects to write on and get feedback on your spelling, grammar and punctuation.

Use the comment form to submit your response.

As time permits, I will edit the first 250 words of your response.

Writing prompt: You’re in the park reading a book, and a lady with a baby carriage sits next to you. You look over in the carriage expecting to see a baby, but you see (fill in the blank). The lady notices you looking and asks you if you’d like to know why there’s no baby and why there’s a (fill in the blank). Write a story about what’s in the carriage and what the lady tells you about it.

© Just Write Right. All rights reserved. Do not use this prompt without express, written permission.

You Can Say That Again! Oh, You Did Say That Again: “Reason Why” Is So Wrong!

So many of us use the phrase—reason why—almost every day in casual conversation, in business communications, on job applications, in research papers, in emails, and even while tweeting, texting, instant messaging and so on!

I hear newscasters say it on television. I hear parents say it to their children in the grocery store when they’re explaining why a child can’t have a toy or a candy bar. I’ve heard teachers say it to their students when teaching a particular lesson. I’ve read it when enjoying a contemporary novel. There’s even a current hit song titled with this phrase.

I liken it to our society’s use of the word “ain’t.” Continue reading You Can Say That Again! Oh, You Did Say That Again: “Reason Why” Is So Wrong!

Do You Write Like You Talk?

“Ma, do you know where my favorite shoes are at,” was a common question I’d ask my mother when I was growing up and leaving my shoes and books and clothes all over the house instead of putting things in my room where they were supposed to go.

“Behind that preposition ‘at’,” she’d say to me.

Of course, at nine years of age I had no idea what she was talking about. My mother, the high school teacher, was trying to give me an English lesson, and I just wanted to find out where I’d left my shoes.

“Why do you always say that when I ask you something?!?!” I finally wanted to know one day, after hearing her say this over and over and over again, and being no closer to finding my shoes or favorite hat or library book. Continue reading Do You Write Like You Talk?